HIV/AIDS
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The HIV/AIDS epidemic in African American communities is a continuing public health crisis for the United States. At the end of 2006, there were an estimated 1.1 million people living with HIV infection, of which almost half (46%) were black/African American.

While blacks represent approximately 12 percent of the U.S. population, they continue to account for a higher proportion of cases at all stages of HIV/AIDS-from infection with HIV to death with AIDS-compared with members of other races and ethnicities.

 

  • AIDS is the leading cause of death among African-American men ages 25-44.

  • In 2007, Blacks accounted for 51% of the 42, 655 (including children) new HIV/AIDS diagnoses in 34 states with long-term, confidential name-based HIV reporting.

  • In 2007, Blacks also accounted for 48% of the 551,932 persons (including children) living with HIV/AIDS in 34 states with long-term, confidential name-based HIV reporting.

  • A study of people diagnosed with HIV found that 56% of "late testers" i.e., those that were diagnosed with AIDS within one year of their HIV diagnosis, were African American. Late testing represents missed opportunities in the prevention and treatment of HIV

  • In 2000, Hispanics represented 13% of the U.S. population (including residents of Puerto Rico), but accounted for 19% of the total number of new U.S. AIDS cases reported that year (8,173 of 42,156 cases).

  • The AIDS incidence rate per 100,000 population (the number of new cases of a disease that occur during a specific time period) among Hispanics in 2000 was 22.5, more than 3 times the rate for whites (6.6), but lower than the rate for African Americans (58.1)

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